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Senior school

English
Students read and compare complex texts, for enjoyment and learning, and can express their thoughts and opinions about what they have read. They can write a wide variety of well-constructed texts such as reviews, reports and narratives. Students develop skills to communicate with others in most settings. They can transfer the literacy skills developed in English to other subjects.
Typically, students will:
·       analyse and explain how authors organise their texts
·       select vocabulary to represent ideas, characters and events
·       compare and analyse information in different texts
·       use evidence from a text to explain their response to it
·       using electronic devices, create detailed texts about a range of topics, including topics they have been studying
·       demonstrate understanding of grammar, including the ability to write complex sentences
·       develop an expanding vocabulary
·       use accurate spelling and punctuation
·       use speaking strategies including questioning, clarifying and rephrasing to contribute to class discussions.
 
Maths
 
Students extend their knowledge of the key areas of mathematics, particularly of fractions and decimals. They increasingly use models, pictures and symbols to represent and communicate mathematical ideas.
Typically, students will:
·       place positive and negative numbers on a number line
·       add and subtract fractions and decimals
·       compare and interpret statistical graphs
·       convert between 12- and 24-hour time and interpret timetables
·       continue and create sequences, involving whole numbers, fractions and decimals, and describe rules
·       measure length, area, volume, capacity and mass, and calculate perimeter and area of rectangles
·       list outcomes of chance experiments
·       apply fractions, decimals, percentages, angles and measurements to solve problems
·       explain mental strategies for calculations
·       pose appropriate questions for statistical investigations.
 
Science
 
Students learn how to look for patterns and relationships. They recognise the important role of variables in investigations. They develop explanations based on evidence.
Typically, students will:
·       investigate adaptations in living things and their interactions with the environment
·       add gases to their study of materials and investigate chemical changes
·       investigate the solar system and the behaviour of light
·       investigate volcanoes and earthquakes
·       deepen their understanding of historical and cultural contributions to science
·       understand how science influences community decisions.
 
HASS
 
Students draw on their growing experience of the wider world and use concrete information sources to learn about history, geography, civics and citizenship, and economics and business.
Typically, students will:
·       investigate Australia’s development from colony to nation, migration and settlement patterns, and contributions of people and groups
·       explore geographic characteristics of Europe, North America and Asia, and the world’s cultural diversity
·       learn about struggles for citizenship and human rights in different groups, in Australia’s past and present
·       explore people’s use of natural resources to satisfy needs and wants, and how consumer choices affect other people and the environment
·       learn about Australia’s democratic values, laws, government and elections
·       investigate people’s participation in the community to achieve civic goals.
 

 Senior school